Space: Views from the Hubble Telescope Book of Postcards

Space: Views from the Hubble Telescope Book of Postcards

Regular price
$14.98
Sale price
$14.98

Few telescopes in history have had as profound an effect on astronomical research as has the Hubble Space Telescope. Yet its influence is not what most people think. By and large, it has not made singular discoveries—achievements that are its and its alone. Instead Hubble has taken what were hints and suspicions from ground-based observations and turned them into near certainties. It has worked in concert with ground-based observatories and other telescopes to provide a multihued view of the cosmos. It has forced theorists to rethink broad-brush theories and to construct new ones that explain astronomical phenomena in much finer detail. In short, Hubble has been extremely influential not by standing apart from other instruments and techniques but mainly by becoming deeply integrated with them.

The Hubble Space Telescope is the invention of American astronomer Edwin Hubble (1889–1953), who discovered large-scale galaxies lying far beyond the Milky Way that are distributed almost uniformly in all directions through space. An astronomer at Mount Wilson Observatory, Pasadena, California (from 1919), and at Mt. Palomar, northeast of San Diego, California (from 1948), Hubble was the first to offer evidence to support the expanding theory of the universe.